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Matriarchal Medicine
(Please klick on photos to see them on an enlarged scale)

Hygieia, Goddess of Healing, created after a Greek original by Lydia Ruyle
Hygieia, Goddess of Healing, created after a Greek original by Lydia Ruyle
Hecate, Goddess of women healers, created after a Roman gem by Lydia Ruyle
Hecate, Goddess of women healers, created after a Roman gem by Lydia Ruyle
Goddess Nature as healer, created after a Roman original in the 13th century
Goddess Nature as healer, created after a Roman original in the 13th century

Cécile Keller: “Matriarchal medicine is basically different from those in western patriarchal societies, which, in many respects, has reached a dead end. The practice of medicine in matriarchal societies has not been researched much, and we are only just starting to recognize its importance.

 

Matriarchal peoples derive their concept of health from their worldview. They believe the universe to be made up of polar powers. For a strong unity to be created, these two powers have to connect, for this represents a balance of power. Therefore, health is seen as a condition of balance inside and outside of the individual. Each disturbance of this balance is seen as a possible cause for disease.

 

The practice of matriarchal medicine arises from the way these cultures understand sickness and health. Application areas include the individual, the clan, the village, the tribe, nature, even the universe itself.”

 

 

Read more in:

 

Cécile Keller:

„The Practice of Medicine in Matriarchal Societies“,

in: Heide Goettner-Abendroth (ed.):

Societies of Peace. Matriarchies Past, Present and Future

Selected papers of the two World Congresses on Matriarchal Studies

Inanna Press, York University, Toronto/Canada 2009, pp. 137-144.